Sunday, May 26, 2013

On frying mochi, and hanging Japanese garments



I really like the mochi cakes, the Japanese glutinous rice blocks that are traditionally found in the traditional New Year soup (zoni). Mochi is usually grilled before going into the soup, but I don't have a grill for it, and tend to just boil it into it for a little. I love it. My family less so. And they don't like the idea of mochi in any our miso soups. So I tried to pan-fry it, thinking that they like everything fried, and guess what? Fried mochi is a new favourite! Now I add a block of pan-fried mochi in almost every Japanese meal I make (that is, while my mochi stock last: it is not so easy to find it in New Zealand!). 

In my (short) experience one of the best ways is to pan-fry mochi is with something that will also give it a bit of flavour, like capsicums. These are the little capsicums from my garden, small but tasty! Heat the oil in the frying pan, add slices of capsicum and mochi, turn everything a few times (I like to turn the mochi blocks on all six sides) and serve hot. Here is my mochi and capsicums served with soba, seaweed salad, avocado and Japanese pickles, a quick and balanced lunch!


And now some photos of my yukata and kimono, hanging to air. I took these photos before the weather turned really wet, now we are getting into winter and it is good to air yukata and kimono before putting them away, especially since I rarely use them anyway, and Auckland can be quite humid! Some of these garments are very old, other new, and they were all presents. I love them!!












Photos and Recipes by Alessandra Zecchini ©

12 comments:

  1. It is almost winter there!! I am waiting for it here :(

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  2. I prepare my mochi in the frying pan too!
    Love your yukata especially that in the last pic, obi seems like a nishikigoi :-)

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    1. I guess that you are talking about the think tie dye belt? I never thought that it looked like a koi, but why not! Anyway, I love these belts, they are called koshihimo and you put them underneath, so after all nobody sees them, like underwear.

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    2. ... koshihimo, I've learnt a new jap word :-)

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  3. Lo dico sempre che il fritto permette di apprezzare tutto ;)
    La stoffe dei tuoi kimono sono bellissime.
    Se ti può consolare anche qui sembra autunno!

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  4. Vero, infatti me devo limitare, o qui mangerebbero tutto fritto! :-)

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  5. I have never had the chance to try mochi but now I really want to. I love the different ideas about how to cook mocha and have to agree that when it doubt always fry it. The picture of your lunch made me hungry. I loved the pictures of your yukata and kimono. I have always had an admiration for kimonos and the patterns that you have are beautiful.

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  6. Your yukatas are so beautiful and definitely lift the mood of the current cold and wet weather.Do you get much chance to wear them in Auckland?

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    1. Not many chances unfortunately, this is why they need a bit of air every now and then...

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  7. I love mochi, Alessandra, be it sweet or savoury :)! Back to the blogging sphere again after being MIA for some time ;).

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  8. Welcome back, I missed your bentos!

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